Electrical & Computer Engineering and Autonomous Vehicles

Autonomous Vehicle Engineeering Picture
Autonomous Vehicle Engineeering Picture
Autonomous Vehicle Engineeering Picture

Electrical & Computer Engineering and Autonomous Vehicles

Robo-Taxis are here!!  In December 2018, Google officially launched Waymo, an autonomous, ride-sharing service in four Phoenix-area suburbs and people are quickly taking advantage of short rides for a small fee. Waymo's autonomous vehicles have already navigated more than ten million miles in 25 cities. This company is crushing the competition in the race to autonomous vehicles.

Behind Waymo’s success is the combination of autonomous vehicle computer engineering and autonomous vehicle electrical engineering. Autonomous vehicle engineers are creating features such as Waymo’s comprehensive sensing system which allows the vehicle to “see” 360 uninterrupted degrees around it at all times; giving a clear advantage over human drivers. GM, BMW, Ford, Mercedes, and other automakers are already implementing similar technology. Designing and developing this level of innovation in the field of advanced mobility is setting a new bar for automotive engineers.

Automakers have been implementing advanced mobility systems in their vehicles for several generations of models; cruise control is just one example. Now partial driving automation features, park-assist, lane centering technology, and collision assist, are becoming standard features making vehicles safer and more efficient. As automakers push for more automation, there is a need for new and more highly developed engineering skills. This means individuals with skills in both electrical and computer engineering, as well as advanced mobility are necessary.


The work of advanced mobility engineers extends beyond creating safer and more efficient vehicles. While driving technology forward, engineers are challenged to design in a way that considers human driver behaviors as part of the vehicle system.  
 

Engineers looking to set themselves apart as autonomous vehicle specialists can benefit from a degree focused on electrical and computer engineering with an advanced mobility focus. Kettering University is shaping the future of the industry with a groundbreaking online program: An MS Engineering-ECE-Advanced Mobility. This cutting-edge advanced engineering degree is designed specifically to meet industry demands for autonomous vehicle development and advanced mobility across transportation systems.

In the MS Engineering-ECE-Advanced Mobility program, engineers learn and practice cutting-edge applications for electric, hybrid, autonomous vehicles, and transportation systems. The program challenges students to work and design in a Simulink lab developing solutions for dynamic systems, controls, and digital signal processing. They also learn to design dynamic systems which enhance and support autonomous functionality, and robotics enhanced by artificial intelligence. Courses challenge engineers to develop the next level of safety, efficiency, and infotainment systems while considering the input of human driver behavior. Students graduate ready to contribute to the future development of electric and autonomous vehicles, mobile robotics and other dynamic systems.
 

Kettering’s MS Engineering-ECE-Advanced Mobility puts today’s automotive engineers in the driver’s seat.

 

Sources:
Phillips, S. (2018). How autonomous vehicles are driving change in the engineering industry. Retrieved from iconnectengineers.com/blog/autonomous-vehicles-driving-change/

Vanderbilt, T. (2018, December). Why waymo’s fleet of self-driving cars is finally ready for prime time. Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved from smithsonianmag.com/innovation/waymo-fleet-self-driving-cars-ready-prime-time-180970713/#TmZuM86Zo2j38cF4.99

forbes.com/sites/stephenmcbride1/2018/12/18/how-google-will-destroy-uber/#679165479f70