Engineering Round Up: Here's What Happened This Week in Engineering

Engineering News - March 25, 2016
Engineering News - March 25, 2016
Engineering News - March 25, 2016

Engineering Round Up: Here's What Happened This Week in Engineering

Below are the top stories reported in engineering this week from around the world. Check out our engineering news round-up post every Friday to stay up to date.

The Mysterious Thing About a Marvelous New Synthetic Cell

Scientists have created a bacterium with a minimal, life-sustaining genome, but they don’t know what a third of its genes do.

The US Military is Working on an Implantable Chip to Make Cyborg Soldiers

Cyborg soldiers could be real very soon, as the U.S. military is developing an implantable chip which, when implanted, will connect human brains to computers.

VW, Porsche Recalling 800,000 SUVs Over Possible Pedal Issue

Volkswagen and its Porsche unit say they're recalling a total of about 800,000 Touareg and Cayenne SUVs worldwide because of a potential problem with the pedal system.

Flexible Turbines Could Enable Cheaper, More Efficient Wind Power

A team of researchers from universities and federal laboratories believe that a palm tree-inspired design could be crucial to developing more efficient offshore wind energy.

National Science Foundation Grant to Kettering University Will Enhance Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Kettering University Applied Biology and Chemistry faculty members have been awarded a $270,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to provide a new Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) site. The REU site will focus on utilizing plants for innovative research in order to cultivate the next generation of scientists and engineers.

Giant Multi-Headed 3D Printer Can Create Massive Objects in One Pass

Called Project Escher, the hardware is more like an assembly line of 3D printers than a single machine. Instead of passing an object from one print head to the next when its job is done, the printheads can intelligently work together to speed up the creation of an object, or each head can work on different areas so that larger prototypes can be produced in one run.